Motivation – It’s all in your mindset

Motivation – It’s all in your mindset

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

Think about a time when you felt really motivated. When you were energised and couldn’t wait to tackle a project, or to get underway with something you wanted to achieve. Maybe you were coaching a new team, or wanting to put into action something you had learnt on a course or read in an article. How did you feel? What was the impact on how you acted? How did it help you to achieve?

Motivation is a critical component for player development. To build your understanding of motivation we will look at the direction of motivation, the sources of motivation, and the two mindsets that players can have regarding their ability. Following on from this we will look at your role as coach in fostering an appropriate motivational environment. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 7

Part 7 – Mentoring

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the seventh article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

Our previous article discussed how you can develop while supporting and assisting another coach. In this article we will start in Part A by looking at how you can develop by working with someone that is external to your coaching environment: a mentor. In Part B we will look at how you can improve your own coaching by mentoring another coach. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 6

Part 6 – Assistant Coaching

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the sixth article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

Coaching can be a lonely affair at times. All too often coaches operate in isolation, coaching their team without really interacting with other coaches. To combat this – and to share some of the load – a coach will sometimes take on an assistant coach. In this
article we will look at how you can improve your coaching by being an assistant
coach. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 5

Part 5 – Reflection

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the fifth article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

In the previous issue we learnt how you can use goal setting within your session plans to improve your development as a coach. To really make goal setting work you need to review and reflect on the sessions you deliver and the goals you set. It is through reflecting on your coaching that you really start to grow as a coach. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 4

Part 4 – Goal setting within session plans

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the fourth article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

In Issue 3 of Taking charge of your coach development we discussed how to set goals as part of your Coach Development Plan. To achieve your goals you need to work at them consistently; setting coach development goals for each session you deliver is an effective way to do this. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 3

Part 3 – Goal setting

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the third article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

In Issue 2 of Taking charge of your coach development we looked at how you can profile yourself as a coach. From this profile you identify areas that you wish to develop. Your Coach Development Plan then describes how you will develop these areas. In this third issue we will look at how goal setting fits into your Coach Development Plan and how to set effective goals. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 2

Part 2 – Profiling

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the second article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

In Issue 1 of Taking charge of your coach development we looked at the importance of having a Coach Development Plan. When creating a Coach Development Plan one of the first steps is to identify your long-term goal. To decide how to reach this goal you need to understand where you are currently. One way to do this is through the use of profiling.

Profiling involves assessing where you are currently on a range of coaching areas. To conduct a profile you first decide what the important areas of coaching are for your sport. From these you choose the areas that are most important for achieving your long-term goal. You then rate yourself in each of these areas, to develop a profile of where you are currently. This process is often done using a profiling wheel, and is a useful tool for developing your coaching. Continue reading

Coaching the end of the season

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

Coaching a team through the final stages of a season can be tough. If winning the title is in your sights then it can be hard to keep your focus on player development and your process goals. If you are out of the running for the championship then just motivating your athletes to turn up and train hard can be a challenge. Towards the end of the season staleness can start to appear, as it becomes harder to keep trainings fresh and intense.

These are some of the challenges you face when coaching a team through the final few games of a season. To address these challenges you must find ways to motivate your athletes to keep training hard and trying to improve. To motivate your players you need to examine how you approach the final training sessions and games. Continue reading

Coaching an unfamiliar sport

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

Twice this week I have had coaches mention the idea of coaching a sport they have never played, including my good friend Mark Carter from the Ministry of Football. Beginner coaches often coach a sport they have never played, as this is how many parents first start coaching. But what would be the effect on an experienced coach if they were to take on a sport they had never played?

Though rare, there are examples of high-level coaches who never played the sport they coached. Cus D’Amato trained heavyweight boxing champions Muhammad Ali and Floyd Patterson, without ever having fought in the ring himself. For this article we will not be looking at coaching an unfamiliar sport at a high level. Instead, we will look at the effect that coaching an unfamiliar sport would have on an experienced coach. What are the benefits, and how would it help them to coach their main sport better? Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 1

Part 1 – A structured approach

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the first article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

As a coach you take the development of your athletes seriously. You help them to set goals, to identify what they need to work on, and then put in place plans to help them to improve. But do you take the same approach to your own development? A lot of coaches will leave their own development to chance, assuming that they will learn and improve by default. Take charge by using a structured process, and treat your own development like you treat your athletes’.

Taking charge of your coach development provides you with ideas for how you can take control of your own development. Each article looks at an area of coach development that you can use to improve your coaching. Part 1 begins by highlighting the importance of taking a structured, proactive approach to your development. The use of a Coach Development Plan to structure your development is discussed, as is the role of qualification courses and workshops. Tips are given on how you can get the best out of the courses and workshops that you attend. Continue reading