Match day coaching

Match day coaching: Using an athlete-centred approach

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

The following is a pre-course reading for a workshop I deliver on Match Day Coaching.

Match day is all about winning, right? Not necessarily. Competition provides players with the opportunity to learn and develop, and should be an extension of their training. A truly effective coach – an athlete-centred coach – provides an environment that ensures players grow continuously, with every training session and every match. In this article we will look at what an athlete-centred coaching approach is and how you can continue to use it on match day. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 9

Part 9 – Observing other coaches

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the ninth article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

Watch and learn. One of the best ways of learning to coach is by seeing it in action. Our previous issue looked at how you can use video observations of your coaching to identify areas to work on. Another way to learn is through observing other coaches delivering. In this article we will look at how you can learn through both formal and informal coach observations. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 8

Part 8 – Video observation

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the eighth article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

In Issue 7 I discussed how mentoring provides an outside view of your coaching. Another way of gaining an alternative view of how you coach is through having your delivery videoed. Coaches often think of video observation in terms of match analysis; it can be just as effective in analysing your coaching effectiveness.

This article will look at how you can video your own delivery in order to improve your effectiveness. I will discuss why you should use video observations, how they can be used, what to do with the information you collect, and how to use it to increase your coaching effectiveness. Continue reading

10 mistakes of a beginner coach – Part 1

Part 1 of 2

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

Making mistakes is an important part of developing as a coach. Which is good, because as a beginner coach I made a lot of them. However, mistakes are only good if we learn from them. As athlete-centred coaches we give our players the freedom to make mistakes, as we know that from these mistakes they will grow and become better players. As coaches it is important that we too learn from our mistakes.

To learn from our mistakes requires us to firstly acknowledge them, and to then look at what we can learn from them. It can be difficult to admit we are wrong, however, to continue to grow we need to embrace the mistakes that we make. In this two-part article I will discuss 10 mistakes that I made as a beginner coach, and through this examine some elements of effective coaching. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 7

Part 7 – Mentoring

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the seventh article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

Our previous article discussed how you can develop while supporting and assisting another coach. In this article we will start in Part A by looking at how you can develop by working with someone that is external to your coaching environment: a mentor. In Part B we will look at how you can improve your own coaching by mentoring another coach. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 6

Part 6 – Assistant Coaching

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the sixth article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

Coaching can be a lonely affair at times. All too often coaches operate in isolation, coaching their team without really interacting with other coaches. To combat this – and to share some of the load – a coach will sometimes take on an assistant coach. In this
article we will look at how you can improve your coaching by being an assistant
coach. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 5

Part 5 – Reflection

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the fifth article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

In the previous issue we learnt how you can use goal setting within your session plans to improve your development as a coach. To really make goal setting work you need to review and reflect on the sessions you deliver and the goals you set. It is through reflecting on your coaching that you really start to grow as a coach. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 4

Part 4 – Goal setting within session plans

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the fourth article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

In Issue 3 of Taking charge of your coach development we discussed how to set goals as part of your Coach Development Plan. To achieve your goals you need to work at them consistently; setting coach development goals for each session you deliver is an effective way to do this. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 3

Part 3 – Goal setting

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the third article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

In Issue 2 of Taking charge of your coach development we looked at how you can profile yourself as a coach. From this profile you identify areas that you wish to develop. Your Coach Development Plan then describes how you will develop these areas. In this third issue we will look at how goal setting fits into your Coach Development Plan and how to set effective goals. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 2

Part 2 – Profiling

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the second article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

In Issue 1 of Taking charge of your coach development we looked at the importance of having a Coach Development Plan. When creating a Coach Development Plan one of the first steps is to identify your long-term goal. To decide how to reach this goal you need to understand where you are currently. One way to do this is through the use of profiling.

Profiling involves assessing where you are currently on a range of coaching areas. To conduct a profile you first decide what the important areas of coaching are for your sport. From these you choose the areas that are most important for achieving your long-term goal. You then rate yourself in each of these areas, to develop a profile of where you are currently. This process is often done using a profiling wheel, and is a useful tool for developing your coaching. Continue reading