Taking charge of your coach development – Part 3

Part 3 – Goal setting

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the third article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

In Issue 2 of Taking charge of your coach development we looked at how you can profile yourself as a coach. From this profile you identify areas that you wish to develop. Your Coach Development Plan then describes how you will develop these areas. In this third issue we will look at how goal setting fits into your Coach Development Plan and how to set effective goals. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 2

Part 2 – Profiling

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the second article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

In Issue 1 of Taking charge of your coach development we looked at the importance of having a Coach Development Plan. When creating a Coach Development Plan one of the first steps is to identify your long-term goal. To decide how to reach this goal you need to understand where you are currently. One way to do this is through the use of profiling.

Profiling involves assessing where you are currently on a range of coaching areas. To conduct a profile you first decide what the important areas of coaching are for your sport. From these you choose the areas that are most important for achieving your long-term goal. You then rate yourself in each of these areas, to develop a profile of where you are currently. This process is often done using a profiling wheel, and is a useful tool for developing your coaching. Continue reading

Taking charge of your coach development – Part 1

Part 1 – A structured approach

Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU

This is the first article in a series of 13 on developing your coaching skills. For the full list of articles in the series see the articles page.

As a coach you take the development of your athletes seriously. You help them to set goals, to identify what they need to work on, and then put in place plans to help them to improve. But do you take the same approach to your own development? A lot of coaches will leave their own development to chance, assuming that they will learn and improve by default. Take charge by using a structured process, and treat your own development like you treat your athletes’.

Taking charge of your coach development provides you with ideas for how you can take control of your own development. Each article looks at an area of coach development that you can use to improve your coaching. Part 1 begins by highlighting the importance of taking a structured, proactive approach to your development. The use of a Coach Development Plan to structure your development is discussed, as is the role of qualification courses and workshops. Tips are given on how you can get the best out of the courses and workshops that you attend. Continue reading